Research Groups

Research Groups

Using quantum gas microscopy of fermionic 6-Li atoms, we are exploring the intriguing physics of the Fermi Hubabrd model and its associated phase diagram. Our unique setup allows for a full spin and density resolved imaging at the single atom level. more
In April 2015, we started a new lab with the aim of studying many-body quantum physics with ultracold strontium atoms in optical lattices. Our lab is located at the Max-Planck-Institute for Quantum Optics in Garching. more
In July 2017, we started the new Caesium lab to study topological many-body phases of matter. We will make use of state-dependent lattices to engineer artificial gauge fields and use the unique possibilities offered by high-resolution imaging techniques to prepare and investigate many-body phenomena in these lattices. more
After a decade-long effort, we have created a degenerate gas of 23Na40K ground-state molecules by assembling a degenerate mixture of sodium and potassium atoms in 2021. We are going to study dipolar quantum many-body systems in a strongly-interacting regime with long-ranged and anistropic interactions in optical lattices.  more
We spatially resolve and manipulate ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. Addressing of individual lattice sites is achieved through a high resolution optical imaging system, which allows for the detection and manipulation of cold atoms with sub-wavelength resolution. more
In this experiment, we use ultracold atoms in a graphene-like honeycomb lattice to realize a clean and highly tunable system in which to probe topological effects that are difficult to study in solid state systems. more
We use fermionic 40K atoms to study the dynamics of highly excited many-body systems. In particular, we investigate thermalization properties of interacting and disordered systems, which feature a new phase of matter, called many-body localization (MBL). more
This new setup uses Ytterbium atoms to generate quantum gases with novel properties. These atoms have a more complex internal structure than Alkali atoms, which allows for state-dependent interaction with light and other atoms. more
We will combine the large-scale clean systems realizable in optical lattices with versatility and control featured by optical tweezer systems to perform analog and digital quantum simulations of spin models and Hubbard systems with extended-range interactions. more
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